Introduction to Systemic Therapy with Individuals: A Social by Fran Hedges

By Fran Hedges

Lately, the advantages and functions of systemic treatment with participants, as well as its extra conventional perform with households, has been more and more well-known. this crucial new textual content offers trainees and practitioners new to this strategy with a full of life, obtainable and carefully sensible creation to the main theoretical innovations and methods.

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All his actions can be excused if he is seen as being ‘overcome’ by anger, not totally responsible for his actions. 38 APPROACHES TO EMOTION AND THE SELF However, ‘we “do” emotions, such as anger, in recognisable “episodes” that have beginnings, middles and ends which are learned, not innate . . differ among cultures, and fulfill the social purposes of the angry person with suspicious regularity’ says Pearce (1994: p. 178). Tom explored the episode with Alistair: as he threw down the hammer the word ‘spazzer’ came to mind (an insult meaning spastic).

I’m a bad mother’ she reiterated. 32 APPROACHES TO EMOTION AND THE SELF Helen knew that historically, because of economic pressures in the West Indies, men were not involved with childrearing as they were forced to seek work away from their wives and children. And it was normal for a grandmother, aunt, or sister to take care of a woman’s child. Therefore the idea that a woman was a ‘bad mother’ because she could not personally care for her children may relate more to the British culture than the West Indian one.

Held together by the conventions and rules of our society’ (Harré and Gillett 1994: p. 154). Where did this insult come from? Fellow schoolboys on the football field at school yelled it at him, when he had played badly. When the ‘simple’ job of putting up some shelves turned into a nightmare, Alistair connected to the frustrated, inept feeling he had had as a boy. Instead of viewing names, concepts, words and feelings as having some kind of metaphysical essence and searching for conceptual similarities (in this case Alistair’s ‘anger’) Wittgenstein (1953) offers the liberating idea of family resemblances.

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